Lawyer Loses Bullying and Sexual Harassment Case

- Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Lawyer Loses Bullying and Sexual Harassment Case

A recent ruling by the Federal Circuit Court found that a law firm hadn’t taken adverse action against one of its solicitors after she complained of bullying and sexual harassment in December 2011.

Emails sent from the solicitor to the firm where she stated that she wanted to consider how to part ways amicably and that the employment relationship had irretrievably broken down were determined to be acceptable as an official resignation. The solicitor had sent two emails on December 13th and had received a confirmation email back stating that her resignation had been accepted and inviting her to make a proposal for a settlement. She didn’t respond and later denied having resigned.

The solicitor had previously made claims of bullying and sexual harassment and the law firm had engaged an independent investigator to evaluate the claims. They had also offered the solicitor leave while the claims were being investigated. She sent the resignation emails on the morning that she was due to be interviewed by the investigator, stating that her leaving would save embarrassment to the firm and prevent sensitive matters from becoming public knowledge.

Allegations of bullying not upheld

The judge ruled against the solicitor in her allegations of bullying. There were eight separate incidents of alleged bullying and harassment by a legal secretary towards the solicitor. Some of the behaviour included the secretary rolling her eyes, huffing, and reprimanding the solicitor for not using the right coloured folders. This behaviour was not sufficient to amount to harassment according to the judge. The judge also noted the potential power imbalance between the solicitor and the secretary which favoured the solicitor as she had a more senior role in the firm.

Sexual harassment claims rejected

In addition to the bullying allegations, the solicitor made claims of sexual harassment against two lawyers in the firm. These claims included claims of passing physical contact and comments by one of the partners about trading in his wife for a younger model which were made in the presence of his wife. These allegations were also rejected by the judge who noted that although the comment may not have been funny to everyone, it didn’t qualify as sexual harassment when made to the solicitor.

Workplace policies found not to be part of contract

The solicitor also claimed that the law firm had breached her contract of employment and argued that the law firm’s workplace harassment prevention policy was expressly incorporated into her contract. This was ruled not to be the case as that particular policy was not expressly identified in the contract and there was no evidence that it had been provided to her when she signed the contract.

The law firm admitted that there was a clause in the contract implying that they would deal with her in good faith and the judge ruled that they had as bullying and harassment had not taken place, the solicitor had been given the opportunity to take time off, and an investigation had been organised into her claims.

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